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In this episode of the Zero Noise marketing podcast, we’re taking on noisy, wasteful social media messaging.  During a recent presentation at the Nappanee Sales and Marketing club, I introduced those in attendance to the essentials of building a tight LinkedIN profile AND how to attract the right prospects with a well-crafted body of content. These principles work whether you’re using Linkedin, Facebook, or any other social media platform.

 

Stick around while we show you how to tune the noise out  of your social media.   This is the Zero Noise Marketing Podcast.

Episode highlights

1:12 We’re using it (social media) for the sake of the medium instead of trying to use the medium for the sake of the message that would serve whatever the audience is.

315 The more reach and accessibility that the medium has, the more noisy it gets and the faster it gets noisy.

5:43 There’s no right or wrong way to do it as long as you’re resonating with people who are like your ideal customer.

6:07 The best way to do that is to do some broad searches on LinkedIn and then analyze the verbage of the ones that are ranking the best and collect them all into a text file and then create one that’s even better that has the essentials that are in those profiles.

7:24 When you’re going through this list of things to optimize your profile with, do it in markets that are a lot more competitive than ours.

8:44 Create some articles that demonstrate your expertise and also deliver on value.

9:27 Developing a value driven system of outreach where you are delivering value as an implicit part of the connection that you make with this new person.

11:08 The closest thing you should ever come to selling is if you see a complex question that is asked in one of these groups, go out and write a thorough explanation. Include videos, images, whatever, put it on your website and then come back to the group with the link because now you’ve got this group of people who are your ideal clients, who you’re getting to know, and better understand now and they’re going to be gratefully driven back to your website.

13:38 There are two distinct types of audiences: There’s the one that is doing a research, has sort of this glimmer of an aspiration on the edge of their consciousness. They’re thinking of doing something with a business like yours sometime in the future.

15:29 So if you come out with fluffy entry-level questions you have to understand that they are going to be best suited to someone who is just getting into thinking about the purchase whereas the person has asked for sophisticated questions is ready to go.

16:04 Your marketing and your content development should be also about converting people from being an unsophisticated entry level customer to a ready to buy customer.

24:42 Interview these people who are in your space, who are talking about services that are being purchased around the same time as this ideal customer is becoming a ready to buy customer in your space.

25:06 Wayne Gretzky used to say: “go where the puck is going”.

31:50 It’s your own resistance that will engender resistance in the customer.

33:35 Sales people can get really really effective by becoming hyper interested in the very specific situation of the person.

35:53 What is the common alternative in all sales situations? Common one is: do nothing. There’s always an alternative: do nothing.

41:15 Don’t underestimate the power of your story.

Full Transcript

Jaeson: I actually, strongly dislike social media. And I’ll tell you why, and I wasn’t sure why, at first I thought well I’ll explain, at the beginning I thought it was just because I’m a contrarian person and I enjoy running in the opposite direction of where the group seems to go but then I noticed that what it really was is that people, when they’re using social media we’re using it for the sake of the medium instead of trying to use the medium for the sake of the message that would serve whatever the audience is. And what I mean by that is those we’re using it for its own sake. So if you handed everyone a bullhorn and said just start you know communicating with large group possible, you would just hear a lot of noise and that’s exactly what we get with a lot of the social media we’re getting. And we joked about it don’t we? We get pictures of people’s cats, we get pictures of what people ate, we get this avalanche of trivia and the problem is it’s even though it’s a very very good medium and it has extraordinary potential for reach and relevance, we are being trained as a species to ignore it. Right? And there’s fatigue that’s happening in this medium. And you’ll notice that if you look back on any medium out there that’s used for advertising, there is a fatigue right? We see it. We’re seeing that right now we’re on the tail end of television. Really. Even with HBO and all these specialized channels, there is a weariness as people are able to choose an option that isn’t trying to sell to them. They’re doing that. And that’s what Netflix and prime Hulu and all these all these channels people are willing to pay a premium to not be sold to. So there’s a weariness there and it’s because of all the racket and that’s really what my personal business philosophy when it comes to marketing is all about I hate racket and I know I hate racket and all of these mediums especially new ones becomes rife with noise very very quickly as everyone piles on and plays with it. And the more reach and accessibility that the medium has, the more noisy it gets and the faster it gets noisy. So that’s why I just dislike social media, there’s the noise and I’m very sensitive to noise. So I was one of the first person people to just sort of drop though but I’m in it for my clients where it matters if their message can be boiled down to some essential value that would really help people. So that’s what we’re talking about today, we’re starting with we’re gonna talk about LinkedIn.

I want to, I want to tread lightly on the areas that Mark Didymus talked about in his presentation because he will no doubt be back to give you an in-depth presentation on building your audience, building your connections and the benefits of that and how to do direct prospecting. And I’m going to help you with more the attraction marketing rather than the outreach. He’s more aggressive and I’m you know philosophically introverted although not in life. So anyway, so I’ve been got into a little presentation here. I’ve got you a little set of notes here to kind of go through and update your profile. How many people are on LinkedIn right now? Everybody? More or less. And how many with fewer than 500 people connected to? Everybody. All right, well so that’s something that you’re gonna want to build up but before you do that LinkedIn has a little kind of checklist process where you can go in and make sure that you at least have what they call an all-star profile.

So as you’re going through, you’re gonna want to complete your profile. Make sure that it has a decent picture of you. I can tell you what makes a good LinkedIn picture but what I would suggest you do is go on LinkedIn sometime make a point of doing this and look at a whole bunch of profiles in your space and ask yourself what is in common about the pictures that I really like. You know, because I could tell you that you know this sort of three-quarter view with a smiling guy, it’s great I can tell you black and white is the way to go and tell you color is the way to go. But you know, there’s no right or wrong way to do it as long as you’re resonating with people who are like your ideal customer. So think about that the other thing is you want to do is is collect some keywords and phrases to go into your profile, make sure that when you’re reaching out in your space that you’re targeting the right keywords. The best way to do that is to do some broad searches on LinkedIn and then analyze the verbage of the ones that are ranking the best and collect them all into a text file and then create one that’s even better that has the essentials that are in those profiles because LinkedIn like most social properties and search engines has kind of algorithm that he uses and they’re not going to tell us what it is. But you can infer from what it’s deciding is important, what structures semantically are making an impact right. So if you see a paragraph that has eight sentences and uses you know six of the key words and relevant to you, you know maybe that’s the way to go. And if that if it resembles the other five that came up first when you did a search for Accountants Nappanee or Accountants Kingston or Accountants Toronto, then maybe there’s something to it. So put on your analytical Sherlock Holmes hat and I see if you can figure out what LinkedIn is favoring by the structures that it’s already failing. The other tip I will give you on that front is when you’re going through this list of things to optimize your profile with, do it in markets that are a lot more competitive than ours. It’s not really that interesting if you like rocket to the top and that to me because we’re a small Center and not is that everyone is in tune with that and some of the strongest business advantages at least in a small area are the interpersonal relationships and we’re in a tight community who you know and who the friends that you have know and the recommendations they make in person are probably going to be more important. So if you want to do this in a competitive way in a kind of a world-class forum go to LA, go to New York, go into a big Center where it’s very competitive particularly if you are working in a commoditized market right where it’s difficult to differentiate you from your nearest competitor. So those are some things that you can do now once you have your profile optimized and world-class and looking like you look like you wrote it from your office in Manhattan, we want to create some articles that demonstrate your expertise and also deliver on value. So I’m interested in a value driven outreach. So when someone is prospecting, typically what happens is it’s not value driven if a telemarketer calls you and that is that that’s a broken transaction right they call you up and immediately what happens you’ve been interrupted, you’ve lost some time and you’re annoyed. So and have you done any value out of it at all? No, it’s completely out of balance. So what you should be thinking about doing is developing a value driven system of outreach where you are delivering value as an implicit part of the connection that you make with this new person. There’s a few different ways to do that. One is to participate in groups on LinkedIn or referring specifically to think to LinkedIn things. Again don’t sell if your object here is not to sell in those groups. Your object is to learn the language of this of this group. Think about a prospect group as a foreign country. If you’re going to fly to Portugal this summer, you’re going to have a lot more fun if you speak at these basic Portuguese and there’s a few different ways to do that. You could go down to the Portuguese club and hang out, become a member for a couple of months you know practice what real conversation of Portuguese. You pick up a page. You can read books. But the point is learn the language of your prospect group and the best way to do that is to visit one of these little countries online. And LinkedIn groups are like little countries of people with like interests and of course there are groups like that on Facebook. There are groups like that on other social media platforms. The important thing to do is to get on there, dissipate with valuable information but mostly to learn the language. Find out what’s driving and crazy, what searching them, what kind of questions I made that’s right. The closest thing you should ever come to selling is if you see a complex question that asked in one of these groups, go out and write a thorough explanation. Include videos images, whatever put it on your website and then come back to the group with the link because now you’ve got this group of people who are your ideal clients, who you’re getting to know, and better understand now and they’re going to be gratefully driven back to your website.

So at this point you should have a clear call-to-action for people who are interested in that particular subject. So we’re going to talk a little bit more about the types of things that you can post beyond just answering the specific questions that are being discussed in these groups. What can you do to kind of organize your thinking so that you can create a fundamental body of content on your website and also create blog posts and episodic content right. If you want to create a podcast or a YouTube channel, how can you come up with ideas for episodic content that you can share in these groups? You can share on your website and you can share on Twitter, in other places so at that point the medium becomes less important even syndicated out to as many mediums as you want but the medium is not driving your behavior, it’s the structure of the content that you’re creating they were going to talk about. how to develop that. So if you move on to your next page I’ll let you go through the twenty point checklist for the complete LinkedIn profile when you’re over time there as we only have 30 minutes. I think this could easily be a three hour presentation. So I’ve got this discovery process for content development and it’d be a top-secret process we use in our business to develop the body of content for a potential customer. So we’ll just go through some of these questions and talk about what they mean and feel free to fill them in in your own time or now if something comes to you. That’s up to you. So the first thing we’re going to talk about is the audience. What kind of audience do you want? And I would suggest that there are two distinct types of audiences, if you exclude the ones that are not even interested. There’s the one that is doing a research, has sort of this glimmer of an aspiration on the edge of their consciousness. They’re thinking of doing something with a business like yours sometime in the future, you think if you’re in the insurance business if they have a baby on the way they’re starting to think about the educational fund. It’s not super urgent but it’s out there. They’re starting to look so they’re there in that research mode and so you need a body, a part of your message to be addressing your research audience and then the one that we’re most interested in starting with is the beyond a research audience. How do we identify those in our content? Well they talk differently right? Once you’ve done a bunch of research let’s say that your lifelong dream is to be the owner of one of the Mercedes Benz, you’ve always wanted one that’s what you want to do right and since you were 20 years old and you’re buying the magazines, you’ve been reading about them, you’ve been watching the car you know about mechanic in your town and you’re just waiting for that golden moment when you can afford it. And now at six months out, you’re close to being able to afford Mercedes, what is the quality of questions that you’re asking at this point versus what you were asking when you were 20 years old? So they are a lot more specific. So you’re just about to buy customer. Now, well beyond the research mode is asking much better questions. So if you come out with fluffy entry-level questions, you have to understand that they are going to be best suited to someone who is just getting into thinking about the purchase whereas the person has asked for sophisticated questions is ready to go. So it’s one walks into your dealership and that’s actually very good question, you can take that as a sign that this person is ready right they are a lot further down the road as sort of the footnote to this your marketing and your content development should be also about converting people from being an unsophisticated entry level customer to a ready to buy customer. And their knowledge of the subject makes them feel empowered. They feel less like they’re at the mercy of the salesperson as social media and self-education matures in the marketing and sales process. In our society, salespeople are going to be more about taking orders then about talking people in defense that’s really a thirty-year-old idea. They’re not there to convince you that you need something. You don’t. They’re there to take your order, to answer the last of your questions and they’re usually the ones that resistance questions right? Like if I go into a stereo store and I’ve done all of my research, I’m just hoping he’s gonna say something that’ll make me feel better about what is ostensibly a any irrational purchase I don’t need a stereo never did right but I want him to make me feel better. So that’s really what his role is. And on the other side, this salesperson is informing the development of marketing content that educates people and graduates them through the tire kicker research mode all the way up to ready to buy sophisticated purchaser. So let’s talk about beyond research audience a bit more. Let me know how we did for time. So we want to answer the question of what does this audience want? So beyond the features, we’re talking about what features and benefits, what is the outcome that the customer is looking for and there’s probably a few of them and you can rank the ones you come up with. There will be certain things that they’re interested in right? This is an interesting distinction here, we’re talking with research versus ready to buy what is the need that needs to be satisfied to turn the turn the customer into a prospect into a customer in the research mode. They want to be satisfied with their questions are answered and that they will have a leverage over the salesperson if ever they encounter one. They will know enough to make a sophisticated decision in the marketplace when there are many different options. That’s what they’re ready to buy customer wants one only has enough information but what is your sophisticated customer want now that he knows how to differentiate one model of Mercedes from another, what does he want to know and the card issue is really interesting because it’s counter intuitive in talking to Rob Fenwick who is a consultant I know who does marketing just for car dealerships. You said that a ford buyer is not let me start that over someone who was buying a car and who is bought ford the past is not likely to flip over to become a toyota buyer like those people that will move between brands are very rare. The competition in those industries is really between dealerships. So two Ford dealerships will be in competition not four in a Toyota because those decisions are all made in advance and that illustrates our idea of the research and experiential buyer vs. the ready to buy. So you’re ready to buy a car you already know. Not only do you know the name of it, you know the make, the model, you may have a color in mind, if you’re not giving rush you may also have a menu of features that are very specifically ready to go. So when you walk in to a car dealership, you’re looking for something else. Maybe you’re looking for the dealer you dealt with the last time. It’s more about the relationship you have with the seller then the product itself which is interesting.

So this is why the what does this audience want question is so important. So what does the beyond research under audience understand? So what does the beyond research audience understand? What do they know already? So if there be in my research, what high points have they hit already? What are they talking about? What special feature is really really getting their attention? So we think of the Prius that’s an easy one, because there’s a very distinct unique selling proposition. We all know what it is, or even say what it is. But so what are they interested in of all the other electric cars in that space? What was the distinction that you know? So what are they what options are they comparing when they’re making a logical distinction between the options? What does he already believe? This is an interesting one. So in every industry there is a stigma or some unspoken negative stereotype about either the salesman or the industry or the product but what are those and of those? What can we tell them to help them understand that it’s no longer relevant? Does it stick around a long time using a car salesman? We all have the image of the pushy, manipulative, tweed. Right everybody’s does here right? We think life coaches any industry that we’re in farmers I don’t know if there’s one in career coaching there may be one if you think about it then maybe ones that agree and when you figure out what it is and you get it out there plead with it the floodgates open because you’re lowering barriers, unspoken barriers and the one wants to talk about those elephants in the room you lower those. So what else is he buying? What other vendors is he using? So this is really really interesting too. Sometimes you’re in an industry that has such a long cycle of purchas. Say, cars I mean two to five years insurance, ten to twenty years you know especially never good relationship with your agent every agent that every industry has a buying cycle. So we don’t know especially it’s- I know where they’re at because it’s all underground right they just suddenly pop up one day and you have a customer but you can’t predict that but you can actually there are things that people are buying around that time right? What else are they buying that are signalling that they’re ready to become your customer as well? So if you are selling, if you’re an architect for instance maybe people are buying our detector looks maybe they’re buying a home building ideas maybe, they’re talking to two other customer, other vendors who are not necessarily your competitors but would be very good referral partners for you because they’re talking to the customers at exactly the right time and you can get into that if you have a podcast or even if you just do like an interview with someone and you put the transcript on your blog. Interview these people who are in your space, who are talking about services that are being purchased around the same time as this ideal customer is becoming a ready to buy customer in your space. So if you’re talking to them then you are getting in front of the purchase at exactly the right time. Like Wayne Gretzky used to say: “go where the puck is going” so think about what else they’re buying and who else you can maybe interview in your podcast.

[ctt template=”8″ link=”mr8lc” via=”no” ]Go where the puck is going. – Wayne Gretzky [/ctt]

Audience: Yeah, I go like market resistance to change. And one of the things I would encounter I have a part-time job at home depot, I sell appliances and countertops. And one of the things that I’ve noticed is a lot of people can notice especially people say maybe they do younger without families. And when the first things they save even more less is “Why do I have to have all this stuff?” It’s like the markets giving these families steamed something other than I just wanna go wash my clothes.

Jaeson: There you go, well two things is there a product for somebody just wants to wash their clothes you know excited.

Audience: You know how excited I was when I went home the washing machine and dryer were like so simple. Where’s my mom? She was like oh I can do this this and this with your clothes. I said: “Mom, I don’t have time for that, I just throw it in there and wash.” Right?

Audience: I’ve got five kids all under 10. She said “I have a busy family and I’m an entrepreneur” she said “but I just want to go downstairs take my load of dirty laundry which is diapers, I throw them in the washing machine hit one or maybe two buttons yeah and then go upstairs in my life until goes beep beep beep” from the right.

Jaeson: Yeah, right. Well as a salesman you just can you answer that question is that is what I would say is that a signal that they’re ready to buy right or they’re in research mode, I would say it’s a signal that they’re ready to buy.

Audience: And I always ask, I always say “where are you on? Or where are you looking?”

Jaeson: Right so the question is “can you answer that?” You know you don’t own your own appliance store. So it’s not like you can have a wall of simple options but could you have on hand maybe a sheet of paper that says here are the process is that most people use all the time. If you’re looking at the list right it’s just this button on this button right and just make something like that pull it out of your pocket say it’s this simple. I know this looks like the cockpit of a 747 but some but this this English all you have to do is see here’s a picture of that buttons right there, there’s one here and one there right this is the only page you need.

Audience: Right like everybody’s different right but I mean most people like there’s one that has like a washing machine that has a little one down below and I could never put the life of em in there almost over a year. I couldn’t figure out what it was and one of the salesman said “here’s what I could tell, they can make two washes. Thinking in this she’s got if she’s got to go up tonight she’s got a dress on. Throw it at nine, it’s a time-saver he said. I just got this like last week, this was like yesterday my budget said pieces that’s why he said that’s going to have a little one. So it saves time. So you don’t have to throw him. You know you can just roll in yesterday’s clothes you need to work tonight. Boom! Done!

Jaeson: No, you’re saying yes like rather than saying it doesn’t do that but because you’re still asking them to change their mind. My suggestion is get ahead of them. Don’t ask them to change, show them how this is already the way they want it and just make it clear that’s what I would suggest. And if that means you and they’re becoming the best appliance salesman at Lowe’s or at Home Depot sorry because you have a little binder by your desk where you’ve created all these things with your laser printer at home just say “you’re interested in this one? Yes, great. This is the best rated one and here’s all you have to do for kids clothes.” Right. Here’s all you have to do: just do like a top three simple simple simple so they don’t have to look at five different pages in the manual. That’s neither do they get it home and then they see themselves at home. Here’s what’s going on in their minds. They are visualizing themselves in the laundry room pressing those buttons and once they’ve done that their wallet is practically out.

Audience: Yeah you’re right. Because there is one that says basically: darks, lights, high, low. And I just want this one. Exactly if they buy it it might be good. Like for somebody like me, it would be good actually because you go to explain that the store and then they would say: What the hell did he just say?

Jaeson: You can visualize resistance in any possible sale. Oh absolutely. But you can visualize it as the rails on a rope right or the guardrail on road you’ve got over here. You’ve got complexity and obscurity and confusion right that’s one guardrail over here over here you have boredom certainty and predictability and depending on the personality of the person you are talking to you if they hit this car trailer stop yeah right. If they hit this one, they stop. But if you can keep them in the middle you’re right by giving more certainty regularity and clarity to something that seems complicated then you keep them right in the middle and they move straight through all the resistance disappears. So just visualize it like that: what guardrail is this person hitting? They think this is boring. You know they hate laundry, you’re going to get people like that. I really hate doing laundry. Like no problem right couple little buttons and you don’t think about it anymore because it does this this miss or why don’t I show you this $3,000 one pair that also stops and dries at the end. I don’t know if that’s a thing but then the mistake is to try and change the audience’s mind. Understand the other audiences mind. Meet them where they are. Right. Don’t resist it. Above all else, accept reality yeah you know because it’s your own resistance that will engender resistance in the customer because you want them to change their interchange Commission acted therein somewhere else. That’s the change they’re gonna make. Yeah, they’re gonna change stores that’s what’s gonna happen. Yeah right that’s the only change they’re gonna make. They’re gonna go find someone else to talk to.

Audience: So is it, are you basically saying it’s more of a listening approach?

Jaeson: Mm-hmm yeah yeah it’s a fully accepting almost a metaphysical thing. Fully accepting the reality of the person you’re talking to. Gratitude is like that too. When someone comes in and you’re grateful for whatever it is that they show up with. Right. Then they can tell they can tell that right. They can tell and they’re like oh this person is happy to see me, they’re listening to me. A little game I play what I’m in a sales situation is I try to ask only ask questions. Like never men like almost never stop in a sentence in a period when I’m talking to someone. I always try to ask them to go deeper, ask them to go farther, give me more information because my tendency is to talk too much. That’s my problem. It’s also some of that makes it easy for me to do public speaking but my tendency is to say too much and to deliver the solution I think that’s the kind of thing that’s good. But if you if you ask enough questions example you use solution one thing right yeah yeah yeah well women are usually more agreeable. They’re oriented towards opnness and acceptance.

Audience: It’s honestly what Dr. Phil does. Have you watched Dr. Phil? When you watch Dr. Phil he doesn’t do anything but ask questions that they already know.

Jaeson: Yeah. Like sales people can get really really effective by becoming hyper interested in the very specific situation of the person. Strive to be interested rather than interesting. Just try. The next time have a conversation with anybody on any topic. Just make it 80% questions and see what happens. First of all the other person will think I had the best conversation. They’re having their life even though you said almost nothing. No one even know if I see the point that kinds of conversationalist hardly said a thing particularly if you’re a party. This is a great place to practice this. If you’re at a party or you don’t want to be there and you surrounded by morning people. Try this, you’ll come away going to I have a good time and learn all these new things. And I meant for new people that you know I I didn’t understand really well and I made a new friend: So that’s that full acceptance idea there. Cool. So this is the set of questions that we’ve been going through here should be informing the kind of content that you create because and you may end up writing content that’s not like what you thought you were going to be writing about. And you know what? If you end up with a real surprise into this thought process, you probably did something right because we have at least like walls and and habits preconceived ideas. And as long as we serve service those will end up our lives will look exactly the way they look right now, 20 years from now. Right. But if we abandon them and accept reality, above all else accept reality then our lives will continue to be interesting because there’s like limitless possibility there. Again I’m sorry about the metaphysical footnote. So the other thing to understand is how does the audience describe themselves? Do they have like a they have a term they use describe them, the club they ran at the association, therein find on all the weirder the words work them into your vernacular. So you use them easily and you understand them and you’re using them properly. And what and this is a tough one, what is the audiences alternative? Right. And then what is the common alternative in all sales situations? Use them. Tell emotions. No common one is to nothing. There’s always an alternative do nothing. So ask yourself what stops them in their tracks. Well, will frustrate them, will make them hit the guardrail. Right. Is it boring? I want to think about this is the guardrail of the insurance industry right the only time people purchase it is when they’re in distress or they anticipated distress. But no one wants to think about it so the whole industry needs that will shove themselves into the middle lane. Somehow, absolutely ideas about that but you know insurance or don’t go that means having to tell me about that identified get yourself in the middle. Right so the audience’s alternatives do nothing and what else think about that. What are their alternatives? So you might talk about their alternatives. Educate them on their alternatives. Help them. Show that you know how to evaluate those alternatives. Let’s say there’s a competing alternative. You might even talk about why you are the gateway to that alternative. What they’re not ready for. That well you’re a good place to start if you’re not selling like the a one version of whatever it is that they’re looking at. I say the boat industry. So maybe this year they’re just looking at a fishing boat. Take the kids out, they’re not in their top earning years right between say 25 and 35 but they want to get the kids out on the lake. Give them an appreciation of nature. Solves that problem but they’re not the part where they’re buying the pontoon part boat there on buying a beer barge yet right but you can say hey listen here’s how these things compare. Right. Put your competitors in the continuum and you don’t say anything bad about them. Just see them as part of the circle of life in your industry. You know, you may not ready for this but you know help them see where they are on the continuum of services.

Audience: I think about that as well. As a salesmen that we end up temporarily losing a sale like if I want to serve, if I want something necessarily really simple and describe what I want. And the salesman says well this used appliance store has stuff that will probably better suit your needs. You know, what you’re looking for. I found it’s pretty carefully I’ve been up to I’ve seen people come in even though you know say well where are you? The journey pail fault line probably said them qualify you where you are to where I’m saying. People you know what? I’m confident that it’s a to go on go on shop around to come back and give me yourself dynamic and a lot of times people will come back and you say you know what bothering you? But we did like orderly say no we really like we how you helped us yeah but they, but you use my point as I have said you know go go go find it because I know that come back they buy stuff off me. They say oh yeah some Souls talking to you three months ago. It’s the seed right but it’s really planting that seed and sharing them that you’re the person. And being in it when you go yourself to something and they are telling their neighbor they don’t give me the vibe that you want you’re like I know that’s it for me because I have any customer service for so long than if I’m not getting it there. I’m like, you have ruined the entire thing for me regardless of what the product is. And if I wanted it from the beginning, if that person then the forefront isn’t there then I don’t want it.

Jaeson: So were thinking about our you know our research graduation from research to ready to buy. So in a sales situation like that or someone comes in and they’re kind of like all over the place and then you know I think that we can do is always give them more power mm-hmm right. The next sales day when they talked to if they’re not experts and providing good value, good service and displaying or presenting a good product. They’re in deep trouble when they meet a customer who’s talked to me. Yeah mm-hmm because I’ve given them all the weapons that they need. This may be a grisly way of thinking about it but if they if you educate them like they’re all over the place, you look obviously you’re at the beginning of your journey. You have 15 minutes, I’ll take you through and show you how to understand the differences in all these machines. Damn time for that, yeah five minutes okay so the fundamental side there is really dedicated to all of the other things that people are interested in when they go to your website. What is your professional story? Don’t underestimate the power of your story. Why did you get into this business? Because you’re why is interesting right? Why do people buy art? They buy it not because of the thickness of the paint distribution of colors right when all other things are equal they buy a story. Vincent van Gogh. Why are we interested in him? Great painter. Could I duplicated insta mango probably ahead of time yes and you know a hundred thousand other people probably do the same thing. But the van Gogh is valuable because of the story. So get your story on a website that’s partier positioning. What is your project process? Like nakedly show them what is the process when they come in. Here’s what’s going to happen right and if they like that process they’ll hear from you. It gets them off the rails of I don’t know what’s going to happen into the middle lane. Right now they understand what’s going to happen so they’re in the you’re in the middle lane and they’re moving forward. What is your, how is your approach or business approach? That is your process approach important essentially or uniquely beneficial if it is it might not be and then the fact that you’re talking about it on a video somewhere online is the thing that creates the unique positioning because you’re the only one doing that. How is your approach different? That’s self-explanatory. Basis for informed comparison, give them a lots of pictures of what you’re doing. Before and after videos. Here’s how we do what we do when we come and clean your carpets. We’re wearing a white jumpsuit and we cover all the furniture and whatever it is that you do that makes your particular experience better. Demonstration of working process if you have something you’re building show them a video of that. Here’s the process, don’t be afraid that they go and build their own. They’re probably not going to do that. Any customer that would go and build their own using one of your videos is not a customer you want anyway because they will on your value, your work. Right. Before the relationship is established we talked about some of this already. What do they want to believe? What would you want? What you want them to believe in the end? What problems are they experiencing right now? What information if shared would engender trust the most? So you say you know what this might not be for you and I’ll tell you why and here are two other options in the marketplace and you happy to give you contact information of my two nearest competitors but I’ll tell you why we’re different and you can decide you know what kind of information like that. So that is just about out of time here. If you want to hear more about like lead capture offers and kind of finding out exactly what it is that you need to say to get far better results for your efforts by addressing these targeted prospects. And it’s very hard to recognize our own strengths. So if you have someone like myself or another business associate tell you what your strengths are. So you believe with them in your sales process, it’s great way to get started in because you’re probably blind to the things that are most interesting about you in the marketplace. Thank you for your time.

This has been the Zero Noise Marketing Podcast. Connecting with your ideal prospects in an authentic way does not have to be a complicated process. Visit us at zeronoisemarketing.com to learn more about making Zero Noise Marketing Strategy an important part of your business success. I’m Jason Tanner, thanks for tuning in.

[ctt template=”5″ link=”Tcem4″ via=”no” ]It’s your own resistance that will engender resistance in the customer. -Jaeson Tanner[/ctt]

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